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  • March 30, 2021 2:00 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    REGISTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY WEEK 2021

    Registration will give you access to the exciting events planned for Environmental History Week 2021. Your registration confirmation email will include links to the virtual events. 

    Registration is FREE. Click on the blue REGISTER button in the left column.

    We have offered a paid registration option if you would like to support Environmental History Week and ASEH in this way.

    All events and registration are free, but there are costs associated with organizing and promoting EH Week.

    Your support is very much appreciated! Your donations and membership allow ASEH to support fellowships, grants, prizes, and events like Environmental History Week.

    ASEH is one of many organizations around the world promoting environmental History Week. Please support one of the EH Week International Partners.

  • March 18, 2021 11:00 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    ASEH signed the ACLS Statement Condemning Anti-Asian Violence. Additional ACLS member societies continue to sign on an endorse this statement.

    ACLS is angry and saddened by the recent increase in incidents of violence against Asians and people of Asian descent in the United States and around the world.

    We find ourselves in a moment where, for good reason, we and many other Americans have been and continue to be focused intently on anti-Black racism. But we are reminded by the horrific events in Georgia this week and increased acts of violence over this past year linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, of the deep prejudices affecting Asians in this country. These and other attacks against the Asian-American community represent the latest chapter in our history of xenophobia, which tends to flare during times of crisis.
     
    As an organization invested in supporting and advancing the study of what it means to be human, we believe the humanities and social sciences provide essential learning needed to unlock understanding of our historical pasts, good and bad, and help cultivate knowledgeable empathy for all of us in the present and the future.
     
    ACLS is committed to elevating perspectives on the human experience that have traditionally been marginalized or ignored. Our work and practices are firmly grounded in values led by inclusive excellence and anti-racism.
     
    We encourage educators, lawmakers, and community leaders to take this moment to listen closely to Asian and Asian-American voices and work with them in stemming this latest scourge of prejudice and violence. In the coming days, we will launch a new scholarly resource page focused on histories of anti-Asian bias, as well as the movements that have stood against them. This new page will appear as part of the “Race and Society” resource we first published in Summer 2020.
     
    Our thoughts are with the families of the victims and with the communities impacted, including members of our ACLS family, among which there are many scholars and students of Asian history and life, as well as staff, members, and partners carrying the extra burden of processing these hateful events personally while being asked to operate normally on other fronts.
     
    We commit to learning more and we encourage you to learn more about ways to support anti-violence and anti-hate efforts against the Asian community:
     

    Joy Connolly
    President

    The following ACLS Member Societies have signed on to this statement:

    African Studies Association
    American Anthropological Association
    American Folklore Society
    American Historical Association
    American Musicological Society
    American Society for Environmental History
    American Society for Theatre Research
    American Studies Association
    Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies
    Association of Research Libraries
    Center for Research Libraries
    College Art Association
    Dance Studies Association
    German Studies Association
    National Communication Association
    National Council of Teachers of English
    Organization of American Historians
    Phi Beta Kappa Society
    Renaissance Society of America
    Rhetoric Society of America
    Sixteenth Century Society & Conference
    Society for Ethnomusicology
    Society for Music Theory
    Society of Biblical Literature
    World History Association
  • March 05, 2021 5:00 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    George Perkins Marsh Prize 

    for best book in environmental history

    Winner:

    Jamie KreinerLegions of Pigs in the Early Medieval West (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2020)

    Finalists:

     David FedmanSeeds of Control: Japan's Empire of Forestry in Colonial Korea (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2020)

      Grace KarskensPeople of the River: Lost Worlds of Early Australia (Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 2020)



    Rachel Carson Prize 

    for best dissertation in environmental history

    Geoffrey Wallace, "The History and Geography of Beeswax Extraction in the Northern Maya Lowlands, 1540-1700,” McGill University


    Congratulations to all of the winners of ASEH's 2021 awards and prizes!

    ASEH thanks all of the selection committees for their hard work.


    Join us for Environmental History Week in April to celebrate!

  • March 03, 2021 5:00 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    ASEH is excited to announce its

    2021 Article Prize Winners

    Leopold-Hidy Prize for best article in Environmental History (with Forest History Society)

    Elizabeth Hennessy for her article “Saving Species: The Co-evolution of Tortoise Taxonomy and Conservation in the Galápagos Islands” (April 2020)


    Alice Hamilton Prize for best article outside journal Environmental History

    Christopher Conz for his article “Sheep, Scab Mites, and Society: The Process and Politics of Veterinary Knowledge in Lesotho, Southern Africa, c. 1900-1933" (August 2020) in Environment and History


    2021 Research Fellowship Awardees

    Samuel P. Hays Research Fellowship

    Caroline Grego for her project "Hurricane of the New South: How the Great Sea Island Storm of 1893 Shaped the Jim Crow Lowcountry"


    Equity Graduate Student Fellowship

    Teona Williams for her project examining Black women’s intellectual and social engagement with ecology, land, and Black national ideologies across the Mississippi Delta


    Hal Rothman Dissertation Fellowship

    Terrell Orr for his project "The Roots of Global Citrus in “Nuevo South” Florida and Rural São Paulo, 1965-1995"


    J. Donald Hughes Graduate Research Fellowships

    Alyssa Kreikemeier for her project "Aerial Enclosures: From Commons to Conflict in the American West"

    and

    Matthew Plishka for his project “Battling Banana Blight: Panama Disease, Smallholders, and Jamaica’s Agroecosystem, 1870-1962”

  • February 24, 2021 8:00 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    ASEH is excited to announce the winners of its

    2021 Awards


    The Distinguished Scholar Award is given every year to an individual who has contributed significantly to environmental history scholarship. Congratulations to 2021 winner:

    NANCY LANGSTON


    The Lisa Mighetto Distinguished Service Award is given every year to an individual who has contributed significantly to the development of ASEH as an organization. Congratulations to 2021 winner:

    MARK MADISON


    The Distinguished Career in Public Environmental History is presented every two years to an individual who has promoted environmental history to the public over time. The winner this year is:

    TERRY TEMPEST WILLIAMS


    The Public Outreach Project Award is presented every two years to an environmental history project that engages the public. The award was postponed in 2020. The winner this year is:

    CLIMATE WITNESS: VOICES OF LADAKH


    Join us for Environmental History Week in April to celebrate the winners of our distinguished awards!

    Coming soon! The winners of ASEH's book, article, and dissertation prizes, as well as ASEH research fellowships winners.

  • January 15, 2021 11:20 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Voting is now open for ASEH's 2021 election!

    ASEH holds elections every other year according to the rules set out in our bylaws, which also detail the responsibilities and terms of each office. 

    The Nominating Committee assembled a slate of candidates for the positions of Vice President/President-Elect, Treasurer, Secretary, Council members (3), and Nominating Committee (2). Only active ASEH members are eligible to vote.

    The candidates submitted STATEMENTS. Please read them to learn more about each person on the slate. 

    ASEH Election 2021

    Start: January 15, 2021 End: February 15, 2021

    VOTE NOW

    Thank you for your membership and vote.

  • January 08, 2021 6:00 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    ASEH signed on to AHA's issued statement condemning “the actions of those who, on January 6, stormed the United States Capitol, the seat of the nation’s legislature, the heart of its democratic form of governance.” The AHA deplores the “inflammatory rhetoric of all the political leaders who have refused to accept the legitimacy of the results of the 2020 election and thereby incited the mob.”

    ASEH was one of first 15 organizations to sign onto the statement. The full text and more information, including the signees, can be found here

    Approved by AHA Council, January 8, 2021

    The American Historical Association condemns the actions of those who, on January 6, stormed the United States Capitol, the seat of the nation’s legislature, the heart of its democratic form of governance. This assault on the very principle of representative democracy received recent explicit and indirect support from the White House and from certain senators and representatives themselves. Not since 1814, when the British looted and burned the Capitol, has the United States witnessed such a blatant attack on the “People’s House.”

    Everything has a history. What happened at the Capitol is part of a historical process. Over the past few years, cynical politicians have nurtured and manipulated for their own bigoted and self-interested purposes the sensibilities of the rioters. We deplore the inflammatory rhetoric of all the political leaders who have refused to accept the legitimacy of the results of the 2020 election and thereby incited the mob-and this on the day when the nation reported 3,865 COVID-19 deaths, the highest number reported in a single day since the pandemic began.

    We note with dismay the iconography of the banners carried by the mob—the flag with the visage of the president emblazoned on it, as if loyalty were due an individual and not the rule of law, and the flag of the Confederacy, signaling violence and sedition. Not by coincidence, those people who attacked the Capitol have been described by the current president and his advisers as “great patriots” and “American patriots.” The rioters were neither.

    A day that began with two significant “firsts”—the election of Georgia’s first African American senator and that state’s first Jewish senator—ended with Congress performing its duties according to the Constitution. Yet during the day we witnessed the unprecedented spectacle of a group of Americans desecrating the sacred space of the nation’s Capitol, and terrorizing everyone in it.

    As historians, we call upon our fellow citizens and elected representatives to abide by the law and tell the truth. Our democracy demands nothing less of ourselves and of our leaders.

  • November 05, 2020 8:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Environmental Histories of Anti-Black Racism


    ASEH presents the third webinar in its Race and the Environment series

    November 17, 2020 - 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM (EST)

    WEBINAR LINK

    Brinda Sarathy, Pitzer College (moderator)

    Matthew Himel, Mississippi State University, "Hidden Labor at the Village of Pinehurst: Golf, Environment, and Middle-Class Expectations." 

    Rebecca Johns, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, "Not your Grandpa’s Sierra Club: Examining Racism and Exclusion in the Rhetorical Construction of the Environmental Citizen."

    Hannah Ramer, University of Minnesota, "Planting Gardens, Cultivating Segregation: Real Estate and the Garden Club of Minneapolis, 1910-1925."  


    Addressing racial inequalities is not just a matter of increasing diversity, but also of recognizing and naming anti-Black racism. Humans’ relations with the environment also bear examination. This webinar offers a platform to four scholars who explore different aspects of anti-Black racism in environmental history.

    The webinar begins with a paper on racialized labor. Matthew Himel, Mississippi State University, continues the exploration “Hidden Labor at the Village of Pinehurst: Golf, Environment, and Middle-Class Expectations.” Himel explains how hidden, African American labor created a pastoral playground packaged as unchanging and natural in North Carolina’s pine barrens. 

    Next are two papers on environmental organizations. Rebecca Johns, of the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg presents “Not your Grandpa’s Sierra Club: Examining Racism and Exclusion in the Rhetorical Construction of the Environmental Citizen,” which uses rhetorical analysis to examine the construction of audience and interrogate the Club’s responsiveness to criticisms about racial exclusion. Finally, Hannah Ramer, University of Minnesota, speaks on “Planting Gardens, Cultivating Segregation: Real Estate and the Garden Club of Minneapolis, 1910-1925.” Ramer explains how Garden Club leaders aimed to beautify the city, save money for working families, promote exercise and healthy eating, even while working to block labor organizing, boost profits for real estate developers and institutionalize racial segregation.

    The webinar will begin with presentations by each speaker and conclude with half an hour of questions from listeners.

    WEBINAR LINK

    The American Society for Environmental History will sponsor a series of webinars around Race and the Environment during Fall 2020. The webinars will capture and expand some of the exciting sessions from the March 2020 meeting that ASEH was forced to cancel to the COVID pandemic. ASEH and its members are eager to engage in this transformative cultural moment by sharing their scholarship and discussing its larger implications.  The 2020 Program Committee and the Committee on Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity are organizing the webinars. 

    Sponsored by the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB) under the auspices of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities at Brown University.

  • October 15, 2020 12:00 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Human Race and Non-human Species: New and Forthcoming Books



    October 27, 2020
    7:00 PM - 8:30 PM (EDT)

    Nancy Jacobs, Brown University (moderator)

    Saheed Aderinto, Western Carolina University, “Animality and Colonial Subjecthood in Africa: The Human and Nonhuman Creatures of Nigeria.”

    Bénédicte Boisseron, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, "Afro-DogBlackness and the Animal Question."

    Yuka Suzuki,  Bard College, "The Nature of Whiteness: Race, Animals, and Nation in Zimbabwe."


    Human races and non-human species are intertwined. The Great Chain of Being, the western notion of a hierarchy of living creatures, arrayed species with humans at the apex. Among humans was the ordering of different hues, with lighter-skinned nations at the top and the darkest at the bottom. Whether Black people belonged above or below the line marking animals was a matter of discussion. More recent discourse in animal rights and conservation has continued this association of human races and non-human species by comparing factory farming with the enslavement of Africans, by associating indigenous hunting with animality, and by presenting white conservationists as saviors or as colonizers. In this current moment of reflection on the pervasiveness of race, its interplay with species in environmental thought merits attention. 

    This webinar brings together three authors of recent and forthcoming books about human race and non-human species. Saheed Aderinto of Western Carolina University will speak on his forthcoming book “Animality and Colonial Subjecthood in Africa: The Human and Nonhuman Creatures of Nigeria” (Ohio University Press, 2021). Drawing on rich evidence from a critically important case, this work makes the assertion that animals, too, were colonial subjects. Next, Bénédicte Boisseron, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, will present a synopsis of Afro-Dog: Blackness and the Animal Question (Columbia University Press, 2018). Boisseron investigates the relationship between race and the animal in the Americas and the Black Atlantic, exposing a hegemonic system that measures the value of life. Finally, Yuka Suzuki of Bard College addresses The Nature of Whiteness: Race, Animals, and Nation in Zimbabwe (University of Washington Press, 2017). Suzuki’s work on the intertwining of race and nature in post-independence Zimbabwe explores how conservation has been a political resource for white farmers, even as the killing of Cecil the Lion by an American trophy hunter exposed the tensions in their claims. 

    The webinar will begin with presentations by each speaker and conclude with half an hour of questions from listeners.

    The American Society for Environmental History will sponsor a series of webinars around Race and the Environment during Fall 2020. The webinars will capture and expand some of the exciting sessions from the March 2020 meeting that ASEH was forced to cancel to the COVID pandemic. ASEH and its members are eager to engage in this transformative cultural moment by sharing their scholarship and discussing its larger implications.  The 2020 Program Committee and the Committee on Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity are organizing the webinars. 

    Sponsored by the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB) under the auspices of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities at Brown University.


  • October 01, 2020 9:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    ASEH presents the first webinar in the Race and the Environment seriesNew Perspectives on Black Ecology

    Tuesday, October 13, 2020

    7:00 PM - 8:30 PM (EDT)

    Rob Gioielli, University of Cincinnati (moderator)

    Justin Hosbey, Emory University

    Tony Perry, University of Virginia

    Allison Puglisi, Harvard University

    J.T. Roane, Arizona State University

    Teona Williams, Yale University


    Join us on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 at 7pm EDT

    Join us at

    https://brown.zoom.us/j/92345337994?pwd=b1E3RlB6YmU1SGVEcGZUQnhBVmJjQT09

    The American Society for Environmental History will sponsor a series of webinars around Race and the Environment during Fall 2020. The webinars will capture and expand some of the exciting sessions from the March 2020 meeting that ASEH was forced to cancel to the COVID pandemic. ASEH and its members are eager to engage in this transformative cultural moment by sharing their scholarship and discussing its larger implications. The 2020 Program Committee and the Committee on Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity are organizing the webinars.

    Sponsored by the https://www.brown.edu/academics/humanities/environmental-humanitiesInitiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB) under the auspices of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities at Brown University.

     


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